Four Corners

Antelope Canyon and Page Arizona

These are some of my all-time favorite pictures.  What a great setting for interesting patters, rock formations, etc.  We hiked through slot canyons to get some of these pictures.

Antelope Canyon is the most-visited and most-photographed slot canyon in the American Southwest. It is located on Navajo land near Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, photogenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as Upper Antelope Canyon or The Crack; and Lower Antelope Canyon or The Corkscrew.

The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tsé bighánílíní, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.”

Antelope Canyon was formed by erosion of Navajo Sandstone,primarily due to flash flooding and secondarily due to other sub-aerial processes. Rainwater, especially during monsoon season, runs into the extensive basin above the slot canyon sections, picking up speed and sand as it rushes into the narrow passageways. Over time the passageways are eroded away, making the corridors deeper and smoothing hard edges in such a way as to form characteristic ‘flowing’ shapes in the rock.

Bryce Canyon NP

Hoodoos and rock formations galore.  It looks like a naturally formed cathedral.  So beautiful.

Great Basin NP

We drove Route 50 to get to Great Basin.  The Nevada portion crosses the center of state and was named The Loneliest Road in America by Life magazine in July 1986.  While we drove on it, we never passed another car, nor did we have any behind us.  Our trip started with an excursion to a Triolbite Quarry, where we dug through stones to find the 30 million year old trilobites!  We continued on to the park and spent some time exploring Lehman Caves.  We saw some wild horses when we drove away from the park and ended in Cathedral Rock State Park (which looked like another planet with the crazy formations).

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